Wednesday, September 15, 2010

MUM: The King's Treasury

     Mum was profoundly influenced by the example of George Mueller, born in Prussia (1805-1898), who with his wife Mary founded five orphanages to care for more than 10,000 orphans, housing the first 30 in their own home in1836, without ever mentioning their needs to another human being. Mueller had such faith in God's provision that he once sat down to dinner with a table full of orphans and thanked God for the food--when there was no food. Within minutes of his prayer, a neighbor brought bread, saying he had an unexpected surplus, and a milk truck broke down outside their door, with milk the driver told them needed to be drunk because it was perishable.
     "God worked miracle after miracle in caring for these orphans.  George Mueller records that he never once was deprived of a meal, though at times they came very close to not even having food.  On one occasion, a woman gave 10 pounds for the orphans, which came at a time when one of the houses had no bread and none of them had any milk or money to buy either.  This money came only a few minutes before the milkman's cart was due and breakfast was served!  Another time dinner had to be delayed 30 minutes in order for the answer to come and food to be provided.  Such a postponement happened very few times in the whole history of the orphanages even though thousands of mouths had to be fed daily!" From mini-biography
    Mum's attempt to "go and do likewise" is included in Catherine Marshall's Something More,1974:

From chapter 11, "The King's Treasury":
     "There is endless fascination in seeing what has happened to individuals who have picked up God's challenge to tithe. A correspondent-friend, Barbara Reynolds, had spent nearly eighteen years in Hiroshima, Japan, as a part of the World Friendship Center ministering to atom bomb survivors and crusading for peace. Meanwhile, Mrs. Reynolds had been offered a scholarship to Pendle Hill, the Quaker study center near Philadelphia. It seemed right to accept. There was only one difficulty: she did not have money for the trip home [to the States] It was at this point, she wrote me, that she read Peter Marshall's sermon "Research Unlimited."
     'I will never forget the challenge that started me on one of the most exciting adventures of my life: "Suppose, for example that a group of Christians decided to experiment with the Lord's exhortation to tithe for one year. What do you suppose the results would be?"
     I had never tithed. Quakers don't even pass the collection plate. . . . Nevertheless, when I finished reading that particular sermon, I felt moved to try.
     I began by adding up all the money I had in the world: a few thousand yen in a Hiroshima bank, a couple of hundred dollars in the United States, and some small change in my purse. I resolved to set aside a tenth in a special purse and the next day, withdrew enough from my bank account to start my Fund for the Lord. I also began to keep a special record of my experiment.
     And would you believe it! On January 26th when I began to tithe, I had less than three hundred dollars. When I left Japan two months later (on March 23rd) I was able to turn over, in tithes, more than I had to begin with.
     Now, a year later, I can report that the experiment which I began without any particular expectations has developed into a way of life which has opened up amazing and undreamed-of potential.
     I'm sure you know that I am not speaking of tithing as a way to get rich quick! No, the amazing effect of my tithing experiment has been twofold: (1) It has completely freed me of the panic fear that used to grip me about being penniless. Now I know that my needs will always be supplied. And (2) it has helped me to know the joy of being a channel through which blessings can flow to those around me. The Lord's purse is never empty!"

More on George Mueller's prayers
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Monday, September 13, 2010